Category: Legal News

Suspended EMS Director Now Under State Investigation

The suspended head of the Livingston County EMS department is also now under investigation by state officials.

EMS Director Jeff Boyd was placed on unpaid leave October 17th by county officials who have only said that the action was part of a, “precautionary investigation and record review…related to documentation within the education function of the department.” While no further details have been provided, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed for WHMI that Boyd is now the subject of an active investigation. It’s believed Boyd was one of the employees who received an Advanced EMT certification without attending a course led by Joseph Hahn, who had been the department’s Education Supervisor.

Hahn, who was fired by the county October 4th following an internal investigation, is currently appealing an order by the MDHHS to revoke his license. Sources within Livingston County EMS say that Hahn claimed he gave an ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) card to Boyd. Acting Livingston County Administrator Cindy Catanach would only say, “This is an ongoing investigation and the County will not have further comment until it is complete.” Boyd, who has also declined to comment, was set to retire by the end of the year after more than 30 years of service to the county.

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Revised Bylaws Drafted For Central Dispatch Advocacy Oversight Board

Revised bylaws for Livingston County Central Dispatch’s Advocacy Oversight Board are moving through the approval process.

The AOB board is required per the E911 Service Plan to establish the board, which provides input as need to the Central Dispatch director on topics related to public safety as they coincide with 911 policies and procedures. The Public Safety & Infrastructure and Development Committee of the Livingston County Board of Commissioners met Monday night and approved a resolution to approve revised bylaws for the AOB. The bylaws haven’t been updated since the implementation of the 911 center.

911 Central Dispatch Deputy Director Joni Harvey says the board has always been in existence since the 911 center was started back in 1999. She says the board deals with anything they do at 911 that might affect police, fire and EMS departments so it’s important they all stay on the same page and they all have a say in what’s going on. Harvey tells WHMI the bylaws are really to maintain consistency and make sure everyone is functioning together – adding Livingston County is great about that and this is just one of those boards that help provide that service. Harvey says the board has a certain set of members, which is for the enhanced 911 plan that is filed with the state and all 911 centers are required to follow. It lists specific members the board is required to have such as a member of the Sheriff’s Office, Michigan State Police, a local police department jurisdiction, fire and EMS. Each member also has an alternate they must elect to fill in if they aren’t there.

Harvey says there aren’t really any changes to current practice, they just updated the bylaws to coincide with that they actually do today and how the AOB functions today. She says there won’t be any big changes as far as how the AOB conducts meetings or anything like that; it’s really just to make sure the bylaws match what the practices are for today’s board. She added that the board was involved in making sure that the bylaws are consistent with what they practice today so it’s been a real team effort to get them done. Harvey says she’s happy to have the bylaws updated and it’s always nice to have everything clean and consistent because you never know when openings or vacancies will come up and it makes so much easier to keep the flow of everything moving when there’s something to reference.

The resolution for the revised bylaws will now move to the Finance Committee and then the full Board of Commissioners for final approvals. After those are obtained, the bylaws will be filed with the Michigan State 911 Committee. Harvey says that’s just to make sure the bylaws match what they have in their 911 plan, which is something they’re in the process of updating as well. (JM)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Surprise Offers Have Marion Officials Wanting Property Appraisal

A pair of surprise offers on township property has the Marion Township Board of Trustees wanting to find a more accurate value to what they own.

Though it wasn’t on the market, the 90-acre Darakjian property received two offers last week. The first was from longtime Marion Township resident Vern Brockway, who once owned property on Lucy Road where the Darakjian property sits, and would like to again. His real estate agent was present at the Board’s Thursday night meeting, and said she didn’t know what he planned to do with it.

Brockway’s offer of $250,000 was in the agenda packet. Not in the packet was a $275,000 offer from local builder David Stollman that the Board received that day. Stollman hired attorney and County Board of Commissioners Chairman Don Parker on retainer.

Parker spoke during public comment, believing his client can produce a win-win for the township. During discussion, Parker said his client was interested in the property for a new housing development. Parker is also the Resident Agent for a new nonprofit called Protect Livingston which has been using its Facebook page to advocate against a proposed expansion of the nearby Padnos Iron and Metal scrapyard that would include an industrial shredder.

Parker told the board that the Howell City Planning Commission on Wednesday will hold a public hearing on the expansion plan. Parker said that industrial shedders are used for the destruction of cars and can bring very loud noises, explosions, and even small fires with the process.

With this new found interest, Trustees agreed unanimously that the township should get the property appraised to learn its true value. Neither offer would include the roughly 400 sewer REUs and 65 water REUs. (MK/JK)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Muslim Visibility Exhibit To Host Panel Discussion

A panel discussion this week at Cleary University will explore the issue of Muslim visibility in Livingston County.

The discussion, which will be held on Thursday from 1-3pm, is part of the Halal Metropolis exhibition series at Cleary which seeks to examine Islam through the lens of art, culture, business, music and sport. The discussion, which is open to the public, will feature two speakers; Ali Hussain and Jenn Crooker. Hussain is a writer and artist with a PhD in Islamic studies, while Crooker is an Ann Arbor teacher and mother who converted to Islam in her teens.

Project Manager Razi Jafri said it is important to have discussions like that which will take place Thursday in order to break down barriers and search for those things that can bring us together and not divide us as people. “One of the challenges in our societies is where communities are not understanding each other is that people are afraid to ask questions because they’re afraid of offending. But one of the ways we know we learn (is) by asking, we learn by discussing. Even within that question there’s a sincere curiosity that people have and wanting to know more about a community.”

Thursday’s panel discussion will take place in Richards Hall, located in Cleary University’s Chrysler building in Genoa Township. More information can be found through the link below. (JK)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Lyon Township Exploring Potential Ways To Conserve Land

With continued development in Lyon Township and some resident concerns, officials are exploring ways to potentially preserve land.

The municipality has grown over the past decade with numerous residential, commercial and industrial developments, resulting in the loss of open space and resident concerns about the changing character. Trustee Kristofer Enlow brought up the issue at a recent meeting, saying whenever developments come up he tends to hear chatter from residents about incorporating more green space into developments or conservation areas but also questions about the township buying parcels. That issue was recently highlighted when the board denied a proposal to place 490 housing units on the land currently occupied by Erwin Orchards. In its denial, officials cited the development’s high density as well as concerns over increased traffic.

Enlow attended a land protection workshop, which included information on how a community can raise money to do a PDR program – possibly through a conservation millage. It was noted the township already has a future land use map, a green infrastructure planning process and maps where it wants to promote more or less dense developments so they have an idea of where things could be. Enlow raised the issue to get the board’s opinion as the program could give property owners as an option to make a profit, conserve their property, and legacy in the township and keep future taxes lower for residents and businesses.

Enlow said he has since looked at programs in some neighboring communities, which basically enable property owners to sell their development rights to a public entity such as a township or county and put their property in a conservation easement. He says the owner can still live on the property and sell it, but they essentially get paid to keep all or a portion as a conservation easement. Enlow stressed that whoever owns the property must be willing as it’s just another option for land protection and no “strong-arming” is involved. He further reached out to township planners about drafting a purchase of development rights or PDR ordinance and said it turned out there was already one on the books but it would basically need to be updated and marketed with allocated funding. Enlow stated the initial process for the township started in 2008, which included mapping out different areas of priority zones that have been translated into the township master plan as potential conservation and natural areas.

A representative from the Huron River Watershed Council delivered a presentation at the meeting and reviewed the various benefits of land protection. Watershed Ecologist Kris Olsson told the board the purchase of development rights is basically a land owner agreeing to give up rights to develop the land. She says they can still live on the land or sell it but a government entity or conservancy would purchase the rights to development and then a conservation easement is placed on a piece or all of the property – which runs with the lands when it’s sold so a new owner could not develop the land. Olsson said the purchase amount is typically determined by taking the appraised value currently of allowed development minus the appraised value it would have with the conservation easement on it – which is what would be used to purchase the easement. Olsson said the programs can be important for farmlands because many farmers are aging and feel connected to the land and want to retire but don’t want to see it developed so it gives them some money out of their land but still the option to sell and move.

Olson said the cost but it can be a lot cheaper than actually buying property outright and making it a city or township preserve or park but still protect the land. Olsson said the board has a lot of ordinances for comparison in moving forward although there are some differences to the current one in Lyon Township. She says some communities have a preservation subcommittee or a board that runs the program. There is also specific selection criteria in some ordinances and a scoring system for different lands to compare to in case a lot of property owners are applying. It was noted that some communities will reach out to property owners or do mailings but many sit back and wait for applications. In some cases, communities have opted for millages to do a PDR program since it can be cheaper and less taxes to residents.

Board members discussed perhaps incorporating a future line item into the budget for land or easement acquisition and figure out how to reach out to people. Some questioned if there are still large tracks of land that could benefit from a PDR program and it was relayed that some have since been developed but there are others available. Trustee Lise Blades commented that some residents probably don’t realize their property has this type of potential and it could be prudent to start budget planning for the possibility, save a little bit and then review it annually. Trustee Sean O’Neil commented it could be a good tool to have and worth looking into as it’s not something they’ve used. He felt it could be worthwhile to put a formula together and apply it to a sample property or two to gauge the amount so the board could be more knowledgeable about what the financial impact would be. The board ultimately agreed that it would be beneficial to move forward and a good first step would be to update the ordinance and continue conversations.

More information is included in the attachments. (JM)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

#OptOutside At Island Lake Recreation Area On Black Friday

Livingston County residents have an opportunity to get outdoors and shed some Thanksgiving Day calories instead of taking part in the typical holiday shopping rush.

The #OptOutside movement was started by outdoor recreation cooperative REI in 2015 to encourage people to spend time outdoors on Black Friday. The Huron Clinton Metroparks and REI are again encouraging Michiganders to #OptOutside this Black Friday and walk, hike or bike off the turkey and pumpkin pie and spend the day in nature. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has also joined the #OptOutside movement by waiving all Recreation Passport entry fees on Black Friday so that individuals and families can enjoy their favorite state park, trails, campgrounds and boating access sites. Locally at the Island Lake Recreation Area, there will be a 5-mile hike on the hikers-only Hickory Ridge trail, with lots of options to drop off for those who prefer a shorter distance. The hike starts at the Kent Lake parking lot at 1pm with the Friends of Island Lake State Recreation Area, REI, and the Crossroads Group of the Sierra Club. Participants are encouraged to dress for the weather and wear bright clothing if possible due to hunting season.

Details are available through a link. (JM)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Presentation To Focus On Teen Suicide Prevention

This evening at the Brighton Center for the Performing Arts, a program called “More than Sad” will be presented on suicide prevention.

The speaker will be Corbin Standley, the board chairman of the Michigan Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Jennifer Sprys-Tellner, a grade level principal at the high school, has been in charge of organizing the program. Sprys-Tellner says it would be well worth it for parents, even if their children are only in grade or middle school, to attend the program in order to gain timely, practical tips on how to recognize signs that their child might have a problem with depression, or socializing with other students, or being bullied. And parents will be given practical advice on steps to take to, it is hoped, prevent teen suicide statistics from going up.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, teen suicides rose exponentially in the decade of 2007-2017, increasing 65% in that period. During that time, the rate of suicide deaths for people from age 10 to 24 went up from 6.8 per 100,000 to 10.8 per 100,000. And the CDC, in its report that just came out last month, says that nobody — including the experts — seems to know why.

Sadly, Brighton hasn’t been spared from teen suicides. A Scranton Middle School student committed suicide last year and the year before, Brighton High School student Carl Nagy took his own life. Nagy’s family has been very vocal and active in suicide prevention and has established the Carl Nagy Foundation for Suicide Awareness. This Saturday, Nov. 23rd, the foundation is hosting International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day at the Livingston County Community Mental Health Services offices at the county East Complex, E. Grand River and Challis Road, at 9 a.m.

The suicide prevention program this evening is free to the public, and will take place at the Brighton Center for the Performing Arts from 6-8 p.m. (TT)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Howell Salvage Yard Proposes Expansion Plan

A plan to expand a salvage yard in Howell and add a scrap shredder to process materials is on the agenda this week for city planning commissioners.

Padnos Iron and Metal, acquired the former Regal Recycling property at 645 Lucy Road on July 1st, with the intention of cleaning up the existing site and expanding the operations. Padnos has operations on the west side of the state and Lansing, but this is their first location in eastern Michigan. Planning Commission documents indicate the owner is requesting to expand the existing salvage yard operations to vacant land to the north. That land is the former city-owned Lucy Road Park that was previously sold to Regal Recycling owner Vern Brockway, who planned to develop it, although that never happened. The properties are currently zoned General Industrial.

Padnos is proposing a new tower building on the land, the addition of the shredder and a number of site improvements, including paving a portion of the parcel. Padnos also wants to use certain areas to store gravel. Padnos contends their plan will bring a dormant site back to life and that what they are proposing would be consistent with the General Industrial zoning.

However, city staff did note that a 501(c)(4) organization, Protect Livingston, was formed recently that has discussed the proposed project on its Facebook page. The organization was incorporated on October 14th by Mark Lezotte of the Butzel Long law firm and their Resident Agent is Donald Parker of the Parker and Parker Law Firm. Parker is also the Chair of the Livingston County Board of Commissioners. While the Protect Livingston Facebook page has been actively lobbying against the proposal, city officials say they have yet to hear from the group, except for a FOIA request from Mr. Parker that the City is fulfilling. When asked about his position with Protect Livingston and its role advocating against the Padnos proposal, Commissioner Parker told WHMI he is not the person overseeing the posts on the Protect Livingston Facebook page, although he declined to identify who is. But he insisted his involvement with the organization is as an attorney and private citizen and not as the chair of the county board.

Wednesday’s meeting of the Howell City Planning Commission is set for 7pm in council chambers. A public hearing for the Padnos proposal is the only item on the agenda. (JK)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Runaway Pug Remains On The Loose In Proving Grounds

An intruder at the GM Proving Grounds in Milford remains on the loose, but there is new hope for a happy homecoming.

Rex the pug went missing from his home near Commerce and Hickory Ridge roads on Halloween but has been spotted several times since inside the massive track complex where GM puts test vehicles through the paces. Rex’s owner, Annette Jones, tells WHMI that despite last week’s cold snap and heavy snow, there is evidence that Rex is still roaming the complex which spans both Milford and Brighton townships. Jones says an experienced dog tracker is now working the case and as of Sunday reported fresh paw prints in the snow and other evidence that Rex is still alive.

While she’s happy at that news, her worry for Rex’s safety remains. “I really was at wit’s end because I didn’t know what to do. I’m not a dog tracker, but then finally this lady stepped up and was able to arrange for the Proving Grounds to let her in. Hopefully it’s not too late.”

Jones says the tracker has placed several live traps, along with feeding station and trail cams to try and corral Rex and get him back home. (JK)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney

Meals On Wheels In Need Of Volunteers

Volunteers are being sought to help bring nutrition and a friendly face to the senior citizens of Livingston County.

The Livingston County Senior Nutrition Program is looking for help for the Meals on Wheels program, which delivers hot meals five days a week to senior citizens in all of Livingston County and western Oakland County. Food is prepped out of kitchen space at the Hartland Educational Support Service Center building off M-59. With ever-increasing demand, Meals on Wheels is relying more on volunteers and drivers are being sought but also for other things such as office help or meal packing. There’s always a need for financial donations.

Outreach Director Candie Hovarter tells WHMI Meals on Wheels serves around 700 seniors every day and for many; it represents the only social contact they’ll receive all day. Volunteer drivers typically go to a local senior center to pick up their routes and meals between 9:30 and 10:30am. She says there are usually between 10 to 13 stops on a route and it takes about one hour to an hour-and-a-half to deliver the meals. She says once a volunteer gets familiar with their route, it becomes much easier and more efficient. Hovarter says volunteers are encouraged to chat with the seniors and some will but others might not. She tells WHMI the meal is just as important as the communication because for some, the only person they’ll see on a given day is the volunteer who delivers their meal. She says volunteering can be pretty rewarding and many end up becoming friends with the seniors they serve. There is no minimum time commitment for volunteers and Hovarter says they can even use people willing to be substitutes. Background checks are required for those delivering meals.

Those interested in volunteering can find information by calling 810-632-2155 or visit the provided link. (JM)

Source

Source Website Article – Click Here

Attorney Howell, MIAttorney Brighton, MILivingston County AttorneyCriminal Law AttorneyBankruptcy AttorneyDUI AttorneyDivorce Attorney